Driving Tips -Driving At Night

The nights are drawing in and it is becoming dark earlier and earlier. Will you be driving at night for the first time?

Traffic death rates are three times higher at night than during the day, it has been reported. Many of us are unaware of night drivings special hazards, or we don't know effective ways to deal with them. Do you?

By The Accclaim Team on 11th October 2016 in News

Driving at Night

The nights are drawing in and it is becoming dark earlier and earlier. Will you be driving at night for the first time?

Traffic death rates are three times higher at night than during the day, according to a report. Many of us are unaware of night drivings special hazards, or we don't know effective ways to deal with them.

Why is night driving so dangerous? One obvious answer is darkness. 90% of a driver's reaction depends on vision, and vision is severely limited at night.

Older drivers have even greater difficulties seeing at night. A 50-year-old driver may need twice as much light to see as well as a 25-year old. Another factor adding danger to night driving is fatigue. Drowsiness makes driving more difficult by dulling concentration and slowing reaction time. After a long day at work, or college many of us are tired when we drive at night.

Alcohol is also a leading factor in fatal road traffic accidents, playing a part in about half of all motor vehicle-related deaths. This makes weekend nights more dangerous, because some drivers will have had a drink or two, you should not drink and drive.  

It is recommended that you take the following steps in order to be prepared for night driving:

  • Prepare your vehicle for night driving. Keep headlights, tail lights, signal lights and windows (inside and out) clean.
  • Have your headlights properly aimed. Mis-aimed headlights blind other drivers and reduce your ability to see the road.
  • Don't drink and drive. Not only does alcohol severely impair your driving ability, it also acts as a depressant. Just one drink can induce fatigue.
  • Avoid smoking when you drive. Smoke's nicotine and carbon monoxide hamper night vision.
  • Use your headlights, they may not help you see better in early twilight, but they'll make it easier for other drivers to see you. Being seen is just as important as seeing.
  • Reduce your speed and increase your following distances. It is more difficult to judge other vehicle's speeds and distances when driving at night.
  • You should be able to stop inside the illuminated area of your headlights. If you can't you are creating a blind crash area in front of your vehicle.
  • When following another vehicle, keep your headlights on low beams so you don't blind the driver in front of you.
  • If an oncoming vehicle doesn't lower beams from high to low, avoid glare by watching the right edge of the road and using it as a steering guide.
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